Nile Basin Initiative Secretariat

Biodiversity conservation and utilization of ecosystems in the Nile Basin Wetlands
Ecosystems and biodiversity
Environment
Basin-wide Program
NileSEC Document


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  • Mr.Telly Eugene Muramira ,
  • 01 May 2020
  • Open Access
  • English (United States)
  • Technical Report
  • This study was commissioned by the Nile Basin Initiative with financial support from the German Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) under its International Climate Initiative. The study is part of the global initiative on the Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) whose principle objective is to mainstream the value of biodiversity and ecosystem services into decision making by including nature’s values. The purpose of the study was to identify, quantify and value the key ecosystem services generated by the Semuliki Delta Trans-boundary wetland with a view to stimulating management and funding interventions necessary for the maintenance, restoration or even enhancement of the integrity and productivity of the wetland. The target audience and key stakeholders to the study therefore related to this broad purpose of the study and included local community representatives, local and central government authorities in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, development partners and the international community. The study area measured about 500 square kilometres and was located on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The area comprised of the Semuliki flats in Rwebisengo, Bweramule and Kanara sub-counties on the Ugandan side and parts of Nyacucu, Kalyabugongo, Buguma, Rubungura, Kikoga and Nyanzige Groupings in Ituri Province on the DRC side. The study area has unique physic-geographical characteristics and supports a variety of species of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish populations. It also has a variety of wetland plants including sedges, phragmites and palms of considerable socio-economic significance. Wetlands in the delta were particularly important because of very hot and dry weather conditions in the area during the dry season months of December to March

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